Contemporary Architecture Meets Country Style In Eganstown

Architecture

Modernising a cherished family property is a daunting task. Yet Melbourne-based architecture firm  took up the challenge in Eganstown, just outside of Daylesford, with triumphant results.

The ‘Limerick House’ responds sensitively to the character of the existing property, whilst extending and updating the house, and strengthening its connection to the site and surrounding views.

31st May, 2018

The project by Melbourne-based architecture firm  in Eganstown, just outside of Daylesford. Photo – .

Their extension and renovation of the ‘Limerick House’ responds sensitively to the character of the existing property. Photo – .

Silvertop ash lining boards were used internally. Photo – .

A distinctive pitched roofline was inspired by the existing roofline of the original home, and nearby shearing sheds. Photo – .

Photo – .

Photo – .

Solomon Troup Architects comprises the husband-and-wife team of Lachlan Troup and Beth Solomon. Photo – .

The exterior of the fit-for-purpose weekender. Photo – .

The home is set on a large plot of rural land in Victoria’s spa country. Photo – .

Photography – Tatjana Plitt.

‘Limerick House’ by is a modest, 50-metre-squared addition to an existing home, in Eganstown, just outside of Daylesford in Victoria’s spa country.

Set on a large plot of rural land, the existing house was insular, and like so many older style homes, failed to connect to the outdoors, or capitalise on the surrounding landscape. The new extension gives the original house a new lease on life – re-orienting the home, offering expansive views, and a new connection to the outside. Two large steel doors serve to frame the view of the undulating country hillside, whilst in summer they can be opened to allow the internal spaces to become an extension of the outdoor area.

Black-stained timber decking boards have been used to clad the new building – a bold new take on the ‘weekend cabin’. Constrasting silvertop ash lining boards were used internally, whilst a distinctive pitched roofline was inspired by the existing roofline of the original home, and nearby shearing sheds.

‘The original house was owned by our clients’ father, who built it out of three disused railway cottages,’ explains architect Lachlan Troup. ‘It was important to the clients to retain the essence of the existing house, whilst readapting it into a fit-for-purpose weekender, to be used by future generations.’

A husband-and-wife team, Lachlan Troup and Beth Solomon of Solomon Troup enjoy the ‘human’ element of their role as architects. ‘Building a connection with the client is what we enjoy most about all of our projects’ Lachlan explains. ‘Designing a house for a client is a very personal experience, that in most cases evolves into a lasting friendship’.

‘It was important to retain the essence of the existing house, whilst readapting it for future generations’ – Lachlan Troup.

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